LCDncid

Sections

    Description
    Requirements
    Documents
    Links
    Images
    

Description

LCDncid is a NCID (Network Caller ID) client package that uses the LCDproc server to display NCID Caller ID and user messages on a LCD. It uses LCD information provided by the LCDproc server to automatically configure itself for the LCD used. It supports LCD's with at least 12 columns and with at least one row (12x1). It works best with a 20x4 LCD. If the LCD has more than 4 rows, only the top 4 rows are used.

LCDproc distributes the LCDproc software. It lists supported LCD displays, and third party clients. You can run other clients along with LCDncid.

Most standalone LCD displays are build it yourself, but there are commercial USB LCD displays available.

Adafruit sells a Raspberry Pi, Wi-Fi USB module, case, and a LCD kit that assemlbles into a nice looking unit. See the photo showing the assembled device (The one with pliers in the upper left hand corner).

LCDncid and NCID server deb packages are available for a Raspberry Pi using the Raspbian distribution. If you add a USB modem or gateway, a LCD display, and a USB wireless device you will have a Caller ID device that includes a NCID server. It can be placed anywhere within your wireless network.

Requirements

The NCID (Network Caller ID) server package.
The LCDproc server.

Documents

README
ReleaseNotes
INSTALL
INSTALL-LCDproc-Raspbian
Man Pages

Links

Project Page
Release Notes & Released Files

Images

A 20x4 LCD on a Raspberry Pi showing the LCDncid initial screen.

A 20x4 LCD on a Raspberry Pi showing a CID (Caller ID) call.
Row 2 is indented because no line identifier is displayed.
Row 3 shows the call type and phone number.
Row 4 shows the Caller ID name or alias.

A 16x2 LCD on a Raspberry Pi showing the LCDncid initial screen.

A 16x2 LCD on a Raspberry Pi showing a CID (Caller ID) call.
Row 1 shows the call type and phone number.
Row 2 shows the Caller ID name or alias.

A 16x2 LCD on a Raspberry Pi showing a HUP (terminated) call.
The ncidd.conf file has the hangup option set to 1.
The number or name is in the ncidd.blacklist file.
Row 1 shows the call type and phone number.
Row 2 shows the Caller ID name or alias.

A 16x2 LCD on a Raspberry Pi showing a message split across two rows.
This LCD can only display the first 32 characters of the message.
In this case the last five characters are missing: e.net.