Network Caller ID

News

Project Page

Donate

Sections

Description
Requirements
Required NCID Software Package
Optional NCID Software Packages
NCID Distributions
Other Software Packages
Documentation
Articles
LCD Displays
USB Modems and Ethernet switch TAP
Multi-line Caller ID Ethernet Hardware
Frequently Asked Questions
Known Problems
Historical Links
Contribute
Updates

Description

NCID (Network Caller ID) is Caller ID (CID) distributed over a network to a variety of devices and computers.

NCID supports Caller ID from a modem, devices that take the place of modems, gateways which include VoIP, and android phones.

NCID supports messages. Clients can send a one line message to all connected clients.

NCID supports outgoing calls if the information is provided by a gateway.

NCID supports automatic call termination if the call appears in the blacklist file. Calls can also appear in a whitelist file to prevent a blacklist entry from terminating it. This optional feature requires a modem to hangup the telephone call.

NCID consists of the ncidd server, the ncid universal client, and various client output modules. It also includes NCID, SIP, and YAC gateways.

The server, called ncidd, monitors either a modem, Caller ID device, or gateway for the CID data. The data is collected and sent, via TCP, to one or more connected clients. The server supports multiple gateways which can be used with or without a modem or device.

The client, called ncid, normally displays the Caller ID (CID) data and the Server Caller ID log in a GUI window. The client output can be changed with output modules. One module can send the CID to a cell phone, pager, or any email address. Another can send the CID to any iOS or Android device, and another can speak selected CID information. There are other output modules, including ones that display the CID on a TiVo or MythTV.

The NCID gateway obtains the Caller ID information from other NCID servers.

The SIP gateway obtains the Caller ID information from a VoIP system, using SIP Invite.

The YAC gateway obtains the Caller ID information from a YAC server.

The WC gateway obtains the Caller ID information from from 1 or more Whozz Calling devices.

Running NCID on a Raspberry PI with the Raspbian OS is an inexpensive way to get a dedicated NCID server. By adding a LCD (with LCDproc software) and a USB wireless module, you have a device that can be put anywhere within your wireless network, if it is using a gateway to obtain the Caller ID.

See the NCID software package for the feature list, supported operating systems, and online documents.

See the Project Page for downloads, public forums, news, patches, requests, cvs, and project details.

Requirements

The NCID server requires either a modem that supports Caller ID or RING indication, a Caller ID device like Whozz Calling or NetCallerID, or a Gateway that obtains the Call information.

If using a modem that supports RING but not Caller ID, the NCID server sends "RING" for the number and "No Caller ID" for the name when sending the call information to its clients. The only useful information is the date and time of the call.

NCID runs under Linux, OSX, UNIX, and Cygwin. Fedora, Ubuntu, Raspbian, OSX, FreeBSD, Raspbian, and Cygwin are supported, but it can be built on UNIX based and Linux based systems. In addition, RPM and DEB packages can be built using the source. NCID also runs under Windows if using the cygwin or Ubuntu Window packages. The client runs under Windows but does not support modules.

Required NCID Software Package

Optional NCID Software Packages

NCID Package Distributions

Other Software Packages

Documentation

Articles

LCD Displays

USB Modems and Ethernet switches TAP

There are very few USB modems that advertise support for Caller ID or that they support Linux, OSX, or FreeBSD. All seem to support Windows. A USB modem donated by DualComm Technology, inc was tested with NCID running under Linux. The modem was plugged into a USB port, the NCID serial port was set to /dev/ttyACM0, and the NCID server started. The server was able to configure the modem and use it to get the Caller ID information.

A USB Powered 5-Port 10/100 Ethernet Switch TAP was also donated by DualComm Technology, Inc. It was tested, using port mirroring, to obtain the Caller ID information using VoIP. NCID was able to function properly with it.

If you purchase a modem or Ethernet Switch TAP from dual-comm.com, mention NCID so they know the donations were useful.

If anyone user has a USB modem, Ethernet router switch ATA, or Ethernet switch TAP that supports NCID, indicate it in the open discussion forum

Multi-line Caller ID Ethernet Hardware

NCID only supports one modem, but thanks to CallerID.com donating a developer 2-line Whozz Calling Deluxe Ethernet Link Device, a gateway was developed that supports 2-line, 4-line, and 8-line Ethernet Link Devices. The gateway also supports multiple devices. You can have any combination of 4-line and 8-line devices, with or without one 2-line device. There can only be one 2-line device connected to the gateway. A WC device provides Caller ID, start-of-call and end-of-call information. Some models even support outgoing calls.

See Whozz Calling Products, Pricing, and Compatibility.

If you purchase an Ethernet Link Device from CallerID.com, mention NCID so they know the donation was useful and hopefully provide more donations when needed.

Frequently Asked Questions

Known Problems

Historical Links

Project Page

Get Network Caller ID at SourceForge.net. Fast, secure and Free Open Source software downloads

Some ways to Contribute to NCID:

Donate

Support This Project

Updates


     Sun Feb  2, 2014 - LCDncid 0.10 released, updated the LCDncid home page
     Wed Apr  9, 2014 - Added to the Articles section: Raspberry Pi Telephone Number Blocker
     Thu Apr 16, 2014 - NCID 0.89 released, updated NCID page, updated documentation, documentation also in epub format, updated SDK
     Wed Jun  4, 2014 - NCIDdisplay released
     Sun Jun 15, 2014 - split Available Software Packages into Required NCID Software Package and Optional NCID Software Packages
    

John L. Chmielewski